Packers chat with Bob McGinn

Packers chat with Bob McGinn

Jan. 4 transcript

  • Hi Bob! Are you surprised by the emergence of Cook?
  • OK, folks, let's get underway after a few technical glitches that were my fault ... PM: Not at all. When Jared Cook was on the field this summer, he thoroughly impressed. Now, after recovering from another injury, he is taking advantage of coverage spread thin by other capable receivers. The major surprise has been the reliability of his hands. He dropped way too many passes in Tenn and STL. No matter who the QB has been (Rodgers, Hundley, Callahan), he has precious few drops here since August.
  • I'm curious why McCarthy did not opt to take a knee three times and run out the clock at the end of the game. Instead he ran a play, a player got hurt, the clock stopped, and then because of that stoppage they had to punt. Their fancy dancy analytical guys should be able to tell him there is a greater chance of an injury and clock stoppage running a play than there is taking a knee. Then to top things off with no returner back they punt it out of bounds instead of kicking it deep and letting it roll to take time off the clock. It's no wonder we have suffered so many incredible last second losses in recent years. They were one on-side kick away from have a last second hail-marry shot at the end zone to tie the game when all they had to do was use some common sense in taking a knee. I know you were probably wrapped up writing your story in those final seconds but I'm curious if anyone brought this up. He should be held accountable for decisions that almost let us blow a 14 pt lead in the final two minutes with the ball in our hands and a chance to run out the clock if done right.
  • Don: You're dead right, I never even saw the last 5 minutes trying to meet a tight deadline. He ran Kerridge for no gain, as you discussed, and Spriggs suffered some kind of lower leg injury. Then came two kneeldowns. A run takes a few more seconds than a kneeldown. As for the punt, it was one of the worst ever by a Packer in years. Thanks for the thoughts.
  • I light of the Giants past success at Lambeau, you briefly mentioned Tom Coughlin on your podcast recently. What do you remember about Tom Coughlin when he was the Packers wide receiver coach (1986-1987)?
  • Evan: Tom Coughlin replaced Lew Carpenter as receivers coach in 1986-'87. He also had the title of passing-game coordinator, as I recall. Coughlin was a go-getter, as you can imagine. He was tough on his players, and that included James Lofton. When Forrest Gregg bolted for SMU, I ran into Coughlin at the Senior Bowl in Mobile. He was looking for a job, and he got one with Bill Parcells in NY. I distinctly remember Coughlin asking me, a relative neophyte in the beat business, if I thought he was a good coach. He was persistent about it, too. He was selling himself to me just as he would to prospective employers. It was surreal, to say the least. I bumped into him a few times over the years and he was always, shall we say, intense.
  • Hi Bob & Happy New Year!

    Wow when I wrote you over a month ago this team was dead in the water and like most of the "Arm Chair Quarterbacks" out in the real world, I wanted everybody's head on plate, so it's been a wonderful "guaranteed" six-game winning streak! What scares you the most about the NYG in Sunday's game? Lets hope they don't get a hat trick and beat GB in a HOME playoff game for the third time in the past ten years!!!
  • Mike: At 4-6, 37.5% of the season remained. That's an eternity, and more fans should have realized that. Of course, they could go 6-0 over the last six games. This team should have been playing far better than it was all season. The Giants' confidence looks real to me. Manning has done it here twice in the cold, and they've lost just two of their last 11 games. Remember, when the Giants played here Oct. 9, they were coming off a Monday night road game at Minnesota (24-10 loss, their worst of the season) and the Packers were coming off a bye. That's six days of rest vs. 14 days of rest. Ben McAdoo will be pushing that discrepancy all week in his team addresses.
  • Bob - Thanks for all of your great coverage throughout the season. One of the more important match-ups on Sunday to me is the pass rush of the Packers versus the Giants O-line. The depleted secondary of the Pack will need all the help they can get to limit the passing offense of Odell Beckham and the rest of the Giants. Do you think Clay Matthews, Julius Peppers and Nick Perry can win the one-on-one battles with the Giants offensive line and provide pressure on Eli Manning on Sunday?
  • El Dude: Perry was incredible against the Jints first time around. His 5 1/2 pressures included 2 1/2 against LT
    Ereck Flowers and 2 1/2 against RT Bobby Hart. The expectation is that Hart, who has an arm injury, will be replaced by ex-Packer Marshall Newhouse. Sunday against Washington, Newhouse played all right. He's soft, as he was here, but he does have size and feet and savvy. Flowers is a terrific run blocker but gets sloppy with his technique in pass pro and gets beat too much. The Giants are much better at the guards and center. Diminutive Bobby Rainey played 50% of the 56 RB snaps in the first game. He's third-string now. With Paul Perkins and Rashad Jennings, who missed the first meeting, now in the backfield, the Giants have managed a respectable threat on the ground in the last month. If they can carve out 80-100 yards rushing, it would force Dom Capers out of the two-shell secondary he used to neutralize Odell Beckham. It's imperative for Clay Matthews to play the way he did against the Vikings, not the way he played against the Lions.
  • Hi Bob, what is the state of the Packers secondary?
  • Rudy: This is Wednesday morning so I don't have a clue. Let's assume Quinten Rollins (neck) is withheld, Damarious Randall (knee) plays and Makinton Dorleant (knee) is out. That leaves Randall at LC, LaDarius Gunter at RC and Micah Hyde in the slot, the same way the Packers started the Det game. Remember, Randall (groin) didn't play at in the first NYG game. It was Rollins, Gunter and Hyde. The Packers were ranked 20th by Man-Games Lost in terms of impact from injury. Minnesota and Chicago ranked first and second, if I recall the numbers. It's all just part of the game.
  • How do you think the GM Saga will end in Green Bay? Are we losing guys or is Ted Thompson going to be a high paid semi retired consultant?
  • Love: The Packers have lost Ron Wolf (retirement), Mark Hatley (death), Ted Thompson (Sea), Scot McCloughan (Sea), Will Lewis (Sea), Lenny McGill (Den), John Schneider (Sea), Reggie McKenzie (Oak), Shaun Herock (Oak), John Dorsey (KC) and others from their personnel department over the last two decades. Yet, they continue to win, and they'll probably continue to win next year and the year after and the year after.
  • Without a single decent running back on our team, why in the world won't you give me another chance next year? Isnt it supposed to be three strikes youre out?
  • EL: You get in shape and stay in shape, deal.
  • Who has a better secondary -- Seattle (sans Thomas, as we played them) or New York?
  • Ken: If Janoris Jenkins plays with a bad back, and plays well, the Giants' secondary rates a razor-thin edge on the Seahawks' secondary minus Earl Thomas.
  • Is this another game in which the Packers' defense gets multiple turnovers? Cold weather, Manning's tendency to throw possible interceptions?
  • Bruce: Certainly could be. Eli Manning is a turnover waiting to happen. He has killed the Giants time after time. But Dom Capers must find a way to get people in his space. Not in his face, in his space. At 36, he has no interest in standing tall, delivering and taking a shot. If you just can get near him, the ball's liable to be thrown anywhere. Then picks happen. Capers didn't have to blitz much in the first meeting because his front shut down the Giants' amateurish rushing attack. Rookie Paul Perkins (21-102) was no amateur against the Redskins. If Perkins has reasonable production, the Packers' defense will have to fight a two-front battle, meaning takeaways would be harder to come by.
  • For as much criticism as you and other reporters gave McCarthy this season, are you or any of your other media people going to admit you jumped the gun and were wrong?
  • Jeffrey: The regular season is over. The Packers finished 10-6, three games beneath where I wrote they would finish. The postseason awaits. I picked the Packers to lose in the Super Bowl. Everyone can evaluate the coach and the team after the season is over.
  • Why not try Jeff Janis in the secondary? He's got size, SPEED, and I'm sure he wants to play. Can he tackle? Seems to me if he can catch 'em he can hug 'em. Visualize a longish pass down the right sideline, where he's defending, not trailing badly...
  • Mr. Daddy: Jeff Janis would have no chance playing cornerback. He's a straight-line speed guy with modest flexibility, change of direction and quick twitch. Cornerbacks need more overall athleticism. Janis might have a chance at safety with his body type/Well, I see my time has expired. Thanks to you all for reading us and participating today.//BOB McGINN
Powered by ScribbleLive Content Marketing Software Platform